Some kids mow lawns for a summer job. I sold tie dyed tshirts. Then there’s Luke. He’s my son’s friend who launched a Kickstarter campaign to make a comic book for his summer job and became an author at age 12. I told him it took me until I was in my 30s to do that!

Luke is a funny kid and he’s always drawing comics. So he had the idea to sell them – beats running a lemonade stand, right? Thanks to the genius of Kickstarter, many people can realize their dream of making money doing what they want to do most. That’s exactly what he did. He explains it here:

Here’s Luke’s Kickstarter page. His goal was to raise $1500 but he ended up with just over $1700, enough to publish and send out the book, which is now on Amazon. It’s called Stickman Symphonies.

stickman-comics

One of my favorite parts of his Kickstarter campaign besides the video, is how he drew comics to explain his funding goals.

stickman-kickstarter

Technically Luke isn’t old enough to do a Kickstarter campaign, but his dad Adam helped out. Adam is a talented graphic designer and has access to a green room to film video, plus the skills to do the book layout. So lesson one for kids: think about how you can leverage your parent’s skillset.

Since the campaign was so well done and authentic it got some attention. In fact, people from all over the world were pledging. Luke has even gotten fan mail from Norway. “We got a really nice letter from Kent Coleman’s sister that made us cry it was so nice,” he wrote.

They expected their family and friends to support their campaign but they were shocked to see just how many people they didn’t know joined in. Statistically, just less than half of the projects are funded.  “It gave us global exposure. More than half of those who supported us were strangers who found it on Kickstarter.”

At the time we talked he’d sold 75 copies and was busy packaging them up to mail off. He even started a Twitter profile @ComicsLucas. I heard the story while attending Comic Con in Salt Lake City, Utah (which set a record for the most attended and did it by leveraging Facebook). We all went to a panel about Kickstarter campaigns. Plus he’s good friends with my son (who has gotten a birthday card with Luke’s comics – maybe we should have it autographed).

The panel had some kick*$!& presenters. Some tips I learned from these Kickstarter pros are featured in this Forbes article below. Thanks to Cheryl who wrote it! I think I’ll print a copy for myself and highlight the part where she says I’m brilliant. I’ll carry it in my purse and pull it out when I need a boost of confidence. But back to the article.

Read on Forbes.com:  9 Secrets For A Successful Crowdfund Campaign

Luke says it wasn’t easy to take his drawings and turn them into a book. “It was a lot more work than we imagined, but it will be worth it.” I think what’s best is that he has a talent which will keep paying long after the summer is over. Plus, that’s a great thing to put on his college resume!

Congrats Luke and Adam on a entertaining and successful launch!

Utah’s Kickstarter Pros

After attending the panel I did some research on the speakers. I had no idea that in addition to YouTube celebs, we have Kickstarter celebs here in Utah. You should learn from the best and here are four examples:

Jake Parker of Provo had a $10,500 goal – got $63,483 in
pledges. See http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/jakeparker/drawings/

Howard Tayler of Orem had a $1,800 goal -got $154,294 in pledges. See http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/692211058/schlock-mercenary-challenge-coins

Crabby Wallet of Ogden, Utah. Raised $308k. Had a goal of $10k. http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1369622196/the-crabby-wallet-a-wallet-that-is-not-for-everyon
“Project Fedora” adventure game by Tex Murphyof Centerville, Utah. Goal of $450,000 but raised $598,104
This is just a sampling of the talent here. Utah is already known for YouTube talent and celebs. Looks like we’re not too shabby at Kickstarter celebs either! If you know any I missed, please note them in the comments.
Thank you for sharing!

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